Healthy Babies
 

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Recommendations     Support Resources     Community Resources     Cultural Peer Support     Returning to Work, School

The Benefits of Breastfeeding for Mom and Babies

For Babies
Recent research shows that if 90% of families breastfed exclusively for 6 months, nearly 1,000 deaths among infants could be prevented. Breastfeeding has also been shown to significantly decrease the risk of acute infections as well as the development of type I and type II diabetes, and childhood leukemia.  Additionally, breastfeeding is associated with fewer cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). 

Recent and past studies have also shown that children who nursed for the recommended duration had fewer colds, ear, and throat infections, fewer hospitalizations for respiratory infections, and a reduced risk of asthma. They even scored higher on intelligence tests. 

For Mom
But the benefits don’t end with the child. Mothers who breastfeed have a lower incidence of breast and ovarian cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, and post partum depression. (Source: US Dept of Health and Human Service, Women's Health Office)
 

Breastfeeding Recommendations
In 2011, the US Surgeon General issued a national Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding. This report recommends widespread community efforts to create a supportive environment for new mothers in order to increase breastfeeding rates and improve the health of the nation. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians were joined in February 2016 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in recommending babies be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months, with continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced through the infant’s first year of life or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.

 

A Great Decision,
But Not Always Easy

Local data from the two maternity care hospitals in Lincoln, reports that 91% of moms intend to breastfeed.  However, according to the 2014 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report card, in 2011, only 46% of infants in Nebraska were still breastfeeding at 6 months of age, and less than 26% were breastfeeding at 1 year of age. 
That implies women who choose to breastfeed are not getting the support they need to reach their individual goals.       

Clearly moms need more support!  Below are links where moms can find help.

Support Resources

What to Expect in the Hospital - Breastfeeding friendly hospital procedures.

Skin to Skin - The first hours after delivery are an important time.  Immediate mother and child skin to skin contact is recommended and encouraged with many benefits for both baby and mother. View or download Skin to Skin poster/flyer

Lactation Consulting - Learning to Breastfeed, Breastfeeding Challenges - Some practices have certified lactation (breastfeeding) consultants on staff to answer your questions about breastfeeding.  If you need help getting started or are experiencing difficulties and/or pain with breastfeeding, talk to an IBCLC (International Board Certified Breastfeeding Consultant) in your provider office or contact MilkWorks to talk to an IBCLC on staff there.   

Breastfeeding FAQs - At this link, find the anwers to the most commony asked questions about breastfeeding (Nebraska Breastfeeding Coalition)

Building Your Family Support Network - Building family support for your choice to breastfeed helps everyone share in the joy of the new baby.

 
Cultural Peer to Peer Support

Through a joint collaboration with MilkWorks and the Asian Community and Cultural Center, culturally diverse mothers, trained as Community Breastfeeding Educators (CBEs), are available to provide peer to peer breastfeeding support to mothers in their homes and communities in eight different languages, including Spanish, Arabic, Nuba, Burmese, Karenni, Vietnamese, Chinese and English. 

Community Breastfeeding Educators help new mothers and mothers new to America with challenges they may face on their breastfeeding journeys.  In this video the educators talk about the challenges they faced as new moms.  Find breastfeeding information in a choice of languages from this playlist. For more contact information: Download a brochure about CBEs.

 

Community Resources

MilkWorks - MilkWorks is a non-profit, community breastfeeding center in Lincoln, Nebraska. Under the medical direction of Kathy Leeper, MD, the center provides a wide range of education, support and clinical services to help mothers breastfeed their babies. No mother is denied services based upon ability to pay.  One of our coaltion of community health partners, MilkWorks is also a founding member of the Lincoln Community Breastfeeding Initiative.

Lincoln Community Breastfeeding Initiative (LCBI) - LCBI is collaborative partnership of health care providers, Lincoln hospitals, and community organizations focused on improving breastfeeding rates by creating consistent, accurate breastfeeding messages for new mothers across the spectrum of health care. 

LLCHD - WIC - Another of our community health partners, the Women, Infant, and Children program (WIC), part of the Lincoln Lancaster County Health Department, provides nutrition and health services, and breastfeeding information and support for low to moderate income families.

Family Service – WIC - Family Services Women, Infants, and Children Nutrition Program provides free food, nutrition information, and breastfeeding support to help keep pregnant women, infants and children under five healthy and strong.

Nebraska Breastfeeding Coalition - The Nebraska Breastfeeding Coalition (NBC) is a network of individual members and organizational partners (including Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln) dedicated to improving the health of Nebraskans by making breastfeeding the norm through education, advocacy and collaboration.  The coalition works together to share information and partner in activities to increase breastfeeding rates across the state.  At this site, you can find support resources of all kinds, including breastfeeding videos.

Returning to Work
Returning to work while breastfeeding can require some adjustment but can be successfully accomplished.  First of all, know the law:

Nebraska Fair Employment Practice Act LB 627 (FEPA):
Effective August 30, 2015, Nebraska companies with 15 or more salaried or hourly employees must comply to making reasonable accommodations for break time and appropriate facilities for breastfeeding or expressing breast milk.

Under the Nebraska FEPA, breastfeeding moms are now a protected class similar to race and disability. Employers cannot discriminate on the basis of color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, marital status, and now an individual who’s pregnant, given birth or has a related medical condition (breastfeeding).

Discrimination includes not making “reasonable accommodations” for breastfeeding employees including time off to recover from childbirth or break time and appropriate facilities for breastfeeding or expressing milk.

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) 2010
The FLSA is a federal law applying to any company of 50 or more employees with regard to lactation support. Under this law, an employer shall provide:

  • a reasonable break time for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child for 1 year after the child’s birth each time such employee has need to express the milk
  • a place, other than a bathroom, that is shielded from view and free from intrusion from co-workers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk. An employer shall not be required to compensate an employee for pumping breaks unless they are already providing compensated breaks.

Speak to your employer during your pregnancy to understand their policies and find out what accommodations they can make for expressing and storing your milk safely, privately, and in a clean environment.  Mothers who breastfeed miss less work to care for sick infants than mothers who feed their infants formula. Employer medical costs are also lower. Benefits for employers include higher productivity, lower health care costs, decreased absenteeism, higher loyalty, lower turnover rates, better job satisfaction, and enhanced overall company image and recruiting benefits. 

Work with your employer to find a suitable solution. You can assist your employer by referring them to our resource page for employers.  If your employer is non-compliant with federal law, find help here.

Helpful Resources for Returning to Work, School 
Breast Pumps 
  - MilkWorks
  - CHI St. Elizabeth

    
Classes on Returning to Work or School
  -
MilkWorks
  - CHI St. Elizabeth

US Dept of Health & Human Services
  - The Business Case for Breastfeeding, An Employee's Guide for Returning to Work

Childcare Considerations While Breastfeeding
When a mother must be separated from her baby, it is important that baby’s caregiver (dad, family members, day care providers) understand how to handle and store human milk, as well as tips on introducing baby to a bottle or cup.  
Tips for Childcare Providers.

Breastfeeding in Public
Know the law.  Nebraska has laws that protect your right to breastfeed in public:

Nebraska State Statute LB 197- Allow Breastfeeding as Prescribed
Nebraska was one of the last remaining states to pass a law in 2011 that gives a woman the legal right to breastfeed her child in any public or private location where the mother is otherwise authorized to be. 

Sometimes our society is uncomfortable being reminded of the original function of breasts, which is to feed a child.  But public perception is improving.  For example, “Nursing Nooks”, portable, private space for nursing mothers are now available in some public places, like the Pinnacle Bank Arena, for moms who attend events at the arena.  Any type of public support for breastfeeding removes barriers and has the potential to make it easier for mothers to breastfeed.