Health News Archive
 
  • This month's Health and the City column looks at all things cycling in honor of National Biking Month. Lincoln looks to retain its title.

  • Sedentary behaviors begin to set in shortly after the ripe old age of 7, the researchers found. And contrary to what many have thought, girls are not the only ones who fall prey to less healthy living at a young age.

  • Researchers analyzing 95 studies that included 2 million people found that doubling (from 5 to 10) the servings of fruits and veggies in people's diets could prevent as many as 7.8 million premature deaths worldwide each year.

  • Women who ate poorly as teenagers were more likely to develop early breast cancer, researchers reported in a new study. They found women who ate the most inflammatory diet - heavy in red meat, sodas, sweet foods and white flour - were up to a third more likely to develop breast cancer in their 20s, 30s or 40s compared to women who thrived on salads and whole grains.

  • New study says daily sugar-sweetened beverage intake alters human brain and behavior. Read more.

  • According to Dr. James Levine, director of the Mayo Clinic-Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and inventor of the treadmill desk we lose two hours of life for every hour we sit with too much sitting to blame for all kinds of ailments, including obesity

  • Standing up and walking around for five minutes every hour during the workday could lift your mood, combat lethargy without reducing focus and attention, and even dull hunger pangs, according to an instructive new study.

  • A diet high in saturated fats and sugars, the so-called Western diet, actually affects the parts of the brain that are important to memory and make people more likely to crave the unhealthful food.

  • A veterans organization in California took some abandoned land and in relatively short time, transformed it into a garden sanctuary of healing for local veterans and an exciting place of learning and growing for the children.

  • A sugar industry group paid for studies that underplayed the role that added sugars play in heart disease, researchers reported Monday.

  • Lincoln breastfeeding rates are improving thanks to the Lincoln Community Breastfeeding Initiative and its Community Breastfeeding Educators.The program employs a culturally diverse group of breastfeeding women to provide peer-to-peer support to immigrant and minority women, helping them overcome the fear, stigma and challenges of breastfeeding.

  • Community Crops has brought good nutrition to the heart of the city with their mobile farmer's market. The Veggie Van will offer fresh, locally grown produce at 23rd & O Sts., serving neighborhoods where access is limited.

  • Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln has announced the date, Sunday, Sept. 25, for this year’s annual free outdoor movement festival, Streets Alive! Streets Alive! encourages people to get off the couch, go outdoors and move up and down a stretch of city blocked off from traffic. Visitors can bike, skate, walk, stroll, wheel (any kind of human powered traffic) or even dance their way down a two-mile route lined with exhibitors and entertainers. Streets Alive! is a child, dog and wheelchair-friendly event.

  • Critics call their promotion a flimsy distraction from their unhealthy food and low wages, claiming McDonald’s has a long history of playing up its role as socially responsible neighbor to the African American community while contributing to their health problems. Read more.

  • The House voted Friday to make it easier for you to avoid the harsh truth of how many calories you're devouring as you scarf down that pizza.

  • Jack in the Box has removed sodas from their kids' menus, joining others like McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, Dairy Queen, and Applebee’s which have all made similar moves, along with Subway and Panera, which never had soda on their kids’ menus.

  • Public health advocates say food ads should be tightly regulated. They say food companies use them to entreat us to indulge in fattening products and they link our obesity epidemic to unhealthy foods we see on TV.

  • The ALDI supermarket chain announced this week that it would swap out sweet treats, junk food, and similarly unhealthy impulse buys in the checkout lane for healthier fare like trail mixes, dried fruit, and granola bars.

  • The marketing of energy drinks is highly aggressive and targeted at teens. An Alberta Children's Hospital study suggests that energy drinks could make some teens more susceptible to diabetes. Researchers call for strict enforcement of an age limits for purchasing.

  • When it comes to recess and the importance of play and physical activity, too many schools ignore the current research. Instead of treating recess as an important, in fact crucial, part of a student's day, some schools still act as if recess is a privilege bestowed on well-behaved, compliant students. They use recess as a bargaining tool and withhold it as a form of punishment.

  • Three interventions that reduce childhood obesity - an excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages; elimination of the tax subsidy for advertising unhealthy food to children; and nutrition standards for food and drinks sold in schools outside of school meals - are projected to save more than they cost to implement.

  • It really is harder to lose weight than ever before – and not just because of poor eating habits and inactivity. A new study identifies 6 things that also contribute to our expanding waistlines, including processed foods and "sugar highs".

  • Even though most anti-obesity soda tax campaigns have failed , they have accomplished something larger - they have reminded people that soda is not a very healthy product. They have echoed similar messages coming from public health researchers and others — and fundamentally changed the way Americans think about soda.

  • According to the CDC childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and teens in the past 30 years. That's why Lincoln Public School officials say they're taking the initiative to end this ongoing problem. This school year nutrition specialists are doing research as part of the Smart Lunchroom Movement which is based on a study by Cornell University. Nutrition experts say the goal is to decrease food waste and encourage children to drink more milk and eat more vegetables.

  • PLAY IN THE STREET _ Streets Alive! FREE outdoor movement festival is back on Sunday, Sept. 20, from 1-5PM this year hosted in the Clinton, Hartley, and East Campus neighborhoods. The festival offers health/wellness info, music, dance, fitness, and food along a 2 mile traffic free route.

  • Children who don’t get enough sleep might be more tempted by food, a new study suggests. Five-year-olds who slept less than 11 hours a night were more eager to eat at the sight or reminder of a favorite snack, compared to those who slept longer, researchers reported in the International Journal of Obesity.

  • Workplaces that encourage healthy lifestyle practices are tied to fewer obese employees among millennials, according to a new study.

  • New survey says the vast majority of school nutrition and food service professionals want our kids to be served healthy, nourishing food at school. But now it’s clear that parents, guardians and caregivers feel the same way.

  • KIDS IN UNSAFE NEIGHBORHOODS can still experience the great outdoors and develop healthy nutrition habits at the same time with school gardens. Read about what this school in Dallas is doing

  • A new study by LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center points to the lack of physical activity as the number one predictor of childhood obesity. Lead author, Dr. Peter Katzmarzyk, says what makes this study unique is that it was conducted in 12 countries around the world. "Now we really understand that if you focus on physical activity that this should work regardless of the culture, regardless of the environment."

  • Cities in which residents are physically active have a big advantage over their more sedentary rivals, with better economic productivity, higher property values and improved school performance, as well as a healthier population.

  • While Internet addiction is not yet considered a clinical diagnosis here, there’s no question that American youths are plugged in and tuned out of “live” action for many more hours of the day than experts consider healthy for normal development.

  • Scientists studied how differently fructose and glucose (which have the same chemical makeup) affected the brain activity of study participants. Fructose, while deemed tastier, was less satisfying, signaling the brain to want more. Fructose is more closely tied to fat conversion than glucose.

  • Scientists at Tufts University are linking an estimated 184,00 deaths around the globe to the consumption of sugary drinks.

  • San Francisco lawmakers unanimously voted on Tuesday to put warning labels on all advertisements for sugary beverages. Billboards or taxi-cab ads for Coke or Gatorade will soon bear this message: “WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. This is a message from the City and County of San Francisco."

  • PHL partner and sponsor, Community Health Endowment of Lincoln, mapping project on health disparities in the city of Lincoln is groundbreaking, showing large lifespan differences by zip code. The project will be presented at their annual meeting on June 17 at Bryan East.

  • PHL Director, Bob Rauner talks about the achievements of PHL, LPS, and partners in increasing fitness and helping school kids reach healthier weights - all showing steady improvements.

  • The editorial board of the Lincoln Journal Star commends the work of PHL, the LPS Wellness Program, and their coalition of partners for their successful efforts to increase fitness levels and decrease obesity rates in LPS school children, reversing a nationwide childhood obesity trend.

  • Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, Lincoln Public Schools, and their coalition of community partners reached the National Healthy People 2020 goal for reducing childhood obesity rates in LPS school kids 6 years ahead of schedule. Lowering obesity rates has a long term impact on the health of children.

  • As part of the Fuel Up to Play 60 program, former Husker, Rex Burkhead was in Lincoln to encourage kids to eat right and stay active to be healthy, with comments from Dr. Bob Rauner, Director, Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln.

  • When it's time to trim school budgets, PE, art and music classes are often the first to go. A new study shows that early physical fitness is a path to sustainable fitness for life.

  • Lincoln Mayor Chris Beutler announced today at his news conference that the Streets will again come Alive on Sunday, September 20, from 1-5 PM. Streets Alive!, the free outdoor fun, fitness, and wellness movement festival, will be co-hosted this year by the Clinton, Hartley, and East Campus Neighborhoods. Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln organizes the festival. Learn more ...

  • In partnership with Teach a Kid to Fish, Children’s Hospital & Medical Center expanded its HEROES Pediatric Weight Management Program to Lincoln. Dr. Karla Lester, along with specialty staff from the Omaha HEROES program, began offering services out of the Children’s Specialty Clinic’s 84th and Pioneers Boulevard location in January.

  • Parents beware - some of your kid's favorite fruit drinks have a lot of added sugar, many as bad as regular soda.

  • Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, Teach a Kid to Fish, and the LPS Wellness Program are featured in an LJS article about Eastridge Elementary's Health Fair.

  • The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has committed $500M over 10 yrs to help children nationwide reach a healthy weight. They recognized PHL and partners as a bright spot in the nation for making progress.

  • "Brain breaks,” along with organized games and physical activity at recess and in the class are part of one school’s strategy to educate students holistically.

  • Two Lincolnites, Mike Miller and April Deis, worked tirelessly to get a safe, private, and dedicated space at the new Pinnacle Arena for nursing moms, with help from city officials and the arena manager.

  • New research shows that for men and women across the spectrum of body mass index and belt size, those who got even a little exercise - burning up about 100 calories a day in physical activity - were less likely to die of any cause over a 12-year period than those who were entirely sedentary.

  • British researchers conclude that increasing the duration (to 4 months) of breastfeeding in woman who had already chosen to breastfeed would save Great Britain’s national health system an estimated $60M per year by reducing the number of childhood diseases and rates of breast cancer in nursing moms.